worked example principle

Project #8: Worked Example Screencast

This week was a bit difficult for me as I was tasked with creating a worked example screencast for one of my courses.  Worked examples are not a foreign concept for me, and are often created by the math faculty at the university in which I am employed.  I was initially going to create a worked example on how to use the Lightboard technology we have, but I needed more training on the process.  Therefore, I asked my co-instructional designer her opinion on what we needed a worked example for, and we decided I should create one on how to create an accessible syllabus.

I was lucky that I already had so many technology options at my disposal because of my job.  I decided to use Camtasia to record my screencast and audio.  Before I could even begin recording, I had to revise the syllabus template we were using previously and send it off for approval.  Then, I had to write my script.  I wanted to use the quizzing feature within Camtasia, so I wrote a brief quiz for the video.

Finally, it was time to record.  I had difficulty with my mic, but eventually figured it out.  I was able to use my mic, but not my headphones as I only have on plug-in, but two cables for my headset.  I recorded the video and audio in sections, spliced the sections together, and then added call-outs, captions, a title screen, and arrows to show where I was clicking in the video.  All in all, the entire process from start to finish probably took about five hours.

I’d like to describe my video in greater detail.  One of the things our eLearning department requires is for instructors to create an accessible syllabus.  We are looking for the syllabus to be properly set up for a screen reader to easily relay the information to the screen reader user.  Headings and blank characters have been the main problems in the syllabi we have reviewed in the past, therefore those two areas became my focus, along with how to run an accessibility checker.  For the purpose of this assignment, I will not be providing the documents shown in the video as I do not have permission.  The content within the video is meant for GFCMSU faculty only, but could become Creative Commons if I pursue it.

I thoroughly enjoyed creating this worked example.  It provided me with the understanding of just how time consuming it can be to create excellent content.  I can further empathize with the instructors I assist because of this assignment.

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Photo of instructor Alyssa Finch using a light board to teach math

Project #7: Google Slides Presentation

Click here to view slideshow

This week I was tasked with creating a static multimedia slideshow using Google Slides.  I have used Google Slides for a few years, and I appreciate the simple templates that, if used properly, tend to meet the best practices for multimedia design.  I also like that you can view the speaker notes when presenting, which is how I recommend you view my slideshow that I have linked to above.

If I had more time for this project, I would have integrated some higher-level thinking questions to improve the transfer of learning.  While the presentation itself is not an example of the Worked Example principle, I can definitely integrate some of the principle’s recommendations into the presentation.

I felt it was important to include some of the ways the college I work at uses the Worked Example principle, and I think I explained the Lightboard technology rather well.  I plan to utilize the Lightboard to create next week’s project.  Interestingly enough, the Worked Example I will be creating is “How to Use the Lightboard” as many instructors are not aware of how to use it.

Although this is included in the first slide of the presentation, I want to note that the presentation was based upon the following book:

Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2008). E-learning and the science of instruction, 2nd                           edition. Pfeiffer: San Francisco, CA.