Project #4: Prezi

View the presentation here: http://bit.ly/2mXjrgA

For the past two weeks, I have been working on a narrated Prezi presentation on the Modality Principle.  Essentially, the Modality Principle determines when narration versus on-screen text would be the best mode of content delivery for graphic-based presentations.  I explain more about the Modality Principle in the link above.

The Prezi was very easy to create.  I selected a template from the variety of templates available.  I chose a balance as the Modality Principle is all about balancing the learners’ cognitive load.  I then chose a color scheme that had good contrast.

The interesting thing about Prezi is that the presentations as path-based, meaning that there is a larger graphic and the presentation then zooms in on smaller sections of the graphic.  This visual helps learners understand that the small sections of content are a part of something much larger.  I really like the analogy presented in this manner.

I did not experience any problems while creating my Prezi or voice overs.  It was very easy to add narration to the pathways.  I only wish that there was a setting to zoom in more on the graphic, such as a “grow” effect.  However, this is just a personal preference.

In summary, creating a narrated presentation with Prezi is a breeze.  If you have any feedback on the presentation, I’d love to hear it.

Best Practices for Color and Depth in Graphic Design

Instructor Profile (1)

 

This week I had the opportunity to experiment with color and depth while creating a graphic for my Community of Inquiry Framework course.  A few pieces of information stood out to me when I was learning about color and depth.  I was not aware of the three color attributes; psychological, physiological, and learning related (Lohr, 2008).  In my past studies, I had only learned about the psychological impact of color, so it was interesting to learn more about how color can represent meaning, such as white and the connection to purity.  I immediately thought of a design documentary I had watched a long time ago (the name escapes me now) that discussed how the Diet Coke designers deliberately chose a whiteish hue to for the main part of the can and red for the logo to indicate a “reversal” from the sugary regular Coke’s red with white logo design.  It was a psychological color choice, for sure, but the white hue also made consumers associate Diet Coke with words like “clean” or “pure”.

As far as instructional design for online learning is concerned, color and depth have to be used with a purpose in mind.  As Lohr (2008) indicated, color has the ability to enhance the learning process or detract from the learning process.  Additionally, depth, especially with text, has the ability to make words stand out from the page or screen.  Knowing this, I set off to create another graphic element for my course with color and depth in mind.

Note: The instructor profile infographic serves two purposes: 1) it introduces myself to the students that are taking my course, and 2) it is an example of the instructor profile I will be discussing in the teaching presence portion of the third unit.

Justification of Color/Depth-Considered Design

  1. Describe your users (people that will see the typography in the unit).

The users of my unit will be educators, either undergraduate or graduate level, that are learning the Community of Inquiry (COI) Framework in relation to online course design.  It is assumed that they are adults with at least one student experience in online education.  The users would be capable of reading college-level material.

      2. Why does your design solution work?

 

Color: The infographic I created uses contrast to separate portions of the infographic.  My website for the course will use various blues, grays, whites, and blacks.  I created the infographic with the overall color scheme in mind.  Gray, white, and black look professional and provide a good contrast for most users.  The blue color was added for the color’s ability to invoke feelings of serenity and tranquility.  The Community of Inquiry Framework is supposed to help educators connect easier with their students, but it can be a huge change for some educators.  I wanted to reduce the feelings of stress as the students (educators) learn about the CoI Framework.

Depth:  When I attempted to use drop-shadowing, I did not like the appearance.  Therefore, I used bold fonts in all caps for the heading categories to improve learner focus on the headings.  The adjustments made in regard to scale ensure that the headings do not blend in with the text.

3.  What did you learn from the “user-test”?

My user-test was performed on the same individual from last week’s assignment.  He did not have any suggestions and noted that the colors really “pop out” when he views each section.

4.  What changes did you make to the design after the user-test?

I have not made any changes because the feedback was positive.  I will if my classmates indicate a change needs to be made.

 

References

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle                    River, NJ: Pearson Education

 

Selection Principle in Graphic Design

cognitive-presence-1

This week I learned about the selection principle in relation to graphic design.  Lohr (2008) states that a graphic should be concise, concentrated, and concrete to maximize selection.  Additionally, the designer should consider the “figure”, or what the learner will pay attention to, and the “ground”, or what the learner will not pay attention to when designing a graphic.

My justification below highlights how I considered the three “C’s” when designing the above graphic.

Justification of Selection-Considered Design

  1. Describe your users (people that will see the typography in the unit).

The users of my unit will be educators, either undergraduate or graduate level, that are learning the Community of Inquiry (COI) Framework in relation to online course design.  It is assumed that they are adults with at least one student experience in online education.  The users would be capable of reading college-level material.

      2. Why does your design solution work?

Concise: I reduced the amount of visual information by keeping fonts and colors basic.  I had originally designed the graphic with a gray background and a black silhouette which caused problems with figure and ground by drawing the attention to the silhouette instead of the words inside the graphic.  The switch to a plain white background and a light gray silhouette helped solve the problem.

Concentrated:  I kept the information in the graphic to the key terms only, instead of defining what each word means.  The definitions of the terms will come in the instruction instead.  This graphic is meant to be a “quick look”, so being concise was necessary.  Additionally, only a silhouette was used in a non-attention grabbing color with the words written inside of the oval where the brain would be.

Concrete: The use of the graphic showing the words inside the brain makes it apparent that the words relate to the brain as a whole.

3.  What did you learn from the “user-test”?

My user-test was performed on the same individual from last week’s assignment.  He helped me determine that the random placements of the words inside the brain made it difficult to read the words, and he suggested I align the words in the way you now see in the graphic.

4.  What changes did you make to the design after the user-test?

I changed the word placement and alignment.  I also tested the black versus gray silhouette just to see figure/ground in action, and we determined the gray silhouette was needed to reduce where the learner’s attention is drawn.

 

References

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle                    River, NJ: Pearson Education

#3: Haiku Deck

https://haikudeck.com/p/f0f56694b9

I recently created a brief presentation using Haiku Deck, a Web 2.0 presentation tool that limits the amount of text that can be placed on a slide.  I had used Haiku Deck before, but it had been about two years since my last usage.

The free trial allows a subscriber to create three slide shows.  I decided to make a short presentation about learner-centered instructional design, given a recent experience where I was encouraged to provide feedback on an online learning course.  I focused on only one component because the presentation was meant to be short and sweet.  In all actuality, I could talk about learner-centered instructional design for probably 60 slides.  But, that would not be an effective use of the modality principle!

I decided to use only five slides, one being the title of the presentation.  I included speaker notes throughout the presentation.  The key point was the consideration of cognitive load while designing the navigation of an online course, so I introduced the key point, showed a “before” example of a course, explained cognitive load, and then showed a “redesign” with justification as the last slide.  The only thing I wish I could have been able to do on Haiku Deck is add arrows and captions as I wanted to highlight the areas on the redesign rather than use directions in the speaker notes, such as “The right hand side has a calendar…”.  If I had been able to use arrows and captions, it would have improved the continuity principle, but I accept the tool as it is.

Ultimately, I think I will stick to using Google Slides while considering the modality, continuity, and modality (among many others!) principles.  I have already gotten away from the “wall of text” presentations, so I feel comfortable that I can make my presentations learner-friendly.  Haiku Deck would be excellent for students that are first learning to give presentations with visuals, however, and I wish I had used it when I was an elementary school teacher!

CARP Principles & Designing a Course for Online Educators

social-presence-tools (The PDF has clickable links)

social-presence-tools

My experience in EDTECH 506 has allowed me to work on a large unit of instruction project.  Each week I am challenged to create a graphic using proper design methodologies, principles, and processes. This week was no exception, and the assignment required use of CARP while creating a graphic for my course.

The justification for my project is as follows:

Justification of CARP-Considered Design

  1. Describe your users (people that will see the typography in the unit).

The users of my unit will be educators, either undergraduate or graduate level, that are learning the Community of Inquiry (COI) Framework in relation to online course design.  It is assumed that they are adults with at least one student experience in online education.  The users would be capable of reading college-level material.

      2. Why does your design solution work?

I have used CARP from the beginning of my Edtech career, so I feel quite familiar with the principles of contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity.  In the graphic I created to provide information and suggestions regarding social presence in an online classroom, I used the four principles.  Contrast was used through color choice, although I am uncertain of my final course color-scheme.  Therefore, the colors could change.  I enjoyed the dark background against the colors of the icons.  I also liked the white background with dark orange, which is very striking.  The orange and white really helps the headings stand out.  Alignment was considered, and attempts were made to ensure the alignment is consistent with the paragraphs and bullets (left aligned), and with the top of the icon and the top of the heading.  Repetition was used as the format is always the same: icon, heading, bullets of information.  The colors are also repetitive in the body of the graphic.  Finally, proximity was utilized by keeping the content related to each particular icon grouped together.

3.  What did you learn from the “user-test”?

My user-test was performed on the same individual from last week’s assignment.  He did provide the suggestion of adding bullets to the list, as I had previously created the list in paragraph form.

4.  What changes did you make to the design after the user-test?

I agreed with the addition of bullets to make the design cleaner, but also add to the repetition.  Each bullet is a stand-alone portion of information, so it does make sense.

CARP is an effective and easy way to remember the best practices of graphic design.  I’ll continue to use CARP in every design I create.

Project #2: Static Multimedia Instruction

Click link below to download .pdf of project

how-to-create-and-organize-a-google-scholar-library

I recently designed a static multimedia instruction project using a web 2.0 tool called “Clarify”.  Clarify makes it easy to take screenshots, type instructions, and download the document for distribution.

As a professional familiar with design processes, I decided to follow the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation) process model.  First, I thought of a problem I wanted to help rectify, as that is generally the purpose of a tutorial.  The problem I selected was how to use Google Scholar, specifically to conduct research, save articles, and sort the library according to user preferences.  I determined the users of the tutorial would be adolescents and adults, so I decided use language comparable to a newspaper article.

The learner objectives were created at this point to help me direct my design.  The learner objectives are: After following the steps in this tutorial, you will be able to create your own Google Scholar library.  Additionally, you will be able to organize your Google Scholar library according to your own labels.

The design process came next, along with the need to become familiar with the web 2.0 tool, Clarify.  I decided to practice creating a library and organizing my library with labels I had created.  I concluded that 12 steps would be sufficient enough to thoroughly explain the process.  Once I developed the 12 steps, I considered what screenshots I would need to illustrate the steps.

Finally, it was time to create the document.  I knew the steps I was going to use, so I started each step by taking a screenshot.  I then titled the step, and described the step in detail.  The multimedia principle was considered by including both graphics and words.  Clarify made it easy to apply the contiguity principle because the layout ensured that the screenshot was on the same page as the step and directions.  I added red arrows with descriptions of where the arrow was pointing to illustrate important content versus using a graphic legend.

Although I do not have an audience for implementation and evaluation, I hope my colleagues that are unfamiliar with Google Scholar library will use my tutorial.  I plan to save the tutorial for future distribution, as it will be used when I ask students to conduct research.

Design Process Models and the Development of a Graphic Organizer

community-of-inquiry-framework-graphic-overview-page-1-3

This week, I had the opportunity to read about various design process models and how to use them.  I was already familiar with the instructional design process called ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implement, and evaluate), but the design process I learned about this week went a step farther.  Essentially, I learned that within the ADDIE process, there are additional design processes to consider.  When developing graphics for instruction, the instructional designer must also follow ACE (analyze, create, evaluate) during the design and development portions of the ADDIE model.  While following ACE, the instructional designer must also consider PAT (principles, actions, and tools) to enhance the design of the graphic (Lohr, 2008, p. 91-94).

I practiced my newfound knowledge by creating a graphic organizer that segments the entire unit into “chunks”.  I had to use ACE while considering PAT.  Here is an overview of my process: 1. Analyze: I thought about the goals for my graphic.  Essentially, I wanted the learner to be able to see each of the three presences within the Community of Inquiry Framework, and the individual subsections and descriptions.  I determined the purpose was organization.  2. Create: I considered principles, and I knew with the large amount of text that I did not want any decorative graphics to detract from the information.  The actions of CARP (contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity) were considered as I thought about the design.  Finally, I thought about what typeface I wanted, if I wanted to use color, and what shape the bubbles should be.  3.  Evaluate:  After I created the graphic using LucidChart, I reviewed my design.  I then conducted a user-test, which you can read the results of below.

Justification of Graphic Organizer Design

  1. Describe your users (people that will see the typography in the unit).

The users of my unit will be educators, either undergraduate or graduate level, that are learning the Community of Inquiry (COI) Framework in relation to online course design.  It is assumed that they are adults with at least one student experience in online education.  The users would be capable of reading college-level material.

      2. Why does your design solution work?

This graphic organizer takes the entire COI Framework and divides it into sections.  The colors help to divide the organizer into three evident sections according to “presence”.  The lines help the user navigate through the subsections, with each bubble becoming more specific in relation to the parent section.

3.  What did you learn from the “user-test”?

My user-test was performed on the same individual from last week’s assignment.  He stated that it was evident that there were three distinct categories, but also a variety of subcategories.  He stated that the organization chart was easy to follow.

4.  What changes did you make to the design after the user-test?

I did not make any changes to the graphic after the user-test.  When I initially evaluated the graphic myself, I did not have three colors to help divide the graphic.  I knew color would help create distinction, so I added color prior to the user-test.

In summary, the ACE with PAT process incorporated into the ADDIE process definitely works.  It is easy to get overwhelmed with the big picture, and ACE helped to isolate a portion of the curriculum development that is a necessary “part of the whole”.

References

American Public University System (2016). The Community of Inquiry. Retrieved                                    from http://www.apus.edu/ctl/faculty/community-of-inquiry/

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle                    River, NJ: Pearson Education